Grow-Up

Carl Trueman is a sharp writer who has written an excellent cultural piece on the alarming contemporary trend of perpetual adolescence. Here is a slice that will hopefully whet your appetite for more:

Today is so different. If the poverty and hard work of my grandfather’s era left men middle-aged at thirty, the ease and trivia of today’s society seems to leave us trapped in a permanent Neverland where we all, like so many Peter (and Patty) Pans, live lives of eternal youth. Where my grandfather spent his day hard at work, trying – sometimes desperately – to make enough money to put bread on the table and shoes on his children’s feet, today many have time to play X-Box and video games, or warble on and on incessantly in that narcissistic echo-chamber that is the blogosphere. The world of my grandfather was evil because it made him grow up too fast; the world of today is evil because it prevents many from ever growing up at all.

You may read the entire commentary – “Trapped in Neverland” – by clicking here, and I sincerely hope you do.

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About Travis

Christ follower. Husband of one woman. Father of three young men. Former 11B. Blessed to pastor the Bible Baptist Church of Mount Vernon, KY.
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3 Responses to Grow-Up

  1. Philip says:

    You definitely need to read Death of the Grown-Up by Diana West! It’s just a huge problem in our culture.

  2. Travis says:

    I have read it! Great book, and you are right; this is a huge cultural problem.

  3. Fresh Dirt says:

    My wife wrote her Master’s project on this phenomenon using the first few chapters of Proverbs as a solution to the problem. One of the key things she identified in our culture as a contributing factor was the lack of rites-of-passage where adults call the next generation into the next phase of life. As such, these extended adolescents are like a ship without a rudder flailing about where ever the winds and currents take them without any course, direction, or true vision.

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